Museum trails

Polytechnic Roads

1

RECOnSTRUCTIOn PROJECT CHangIng MOnaSTERy TO MUSEUM

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1947-1952

The building that today houses the Museum was formerly the olivetan Monastery of San Vittore, and later the Villata barracks. After the war-induced destructions, it was selected in 1947 for the headquarters for the Museum upon the initiative of a group of engineers and architects of the Politecnico di Milano: Guido Ucelli, Francesco Mauro, Enrico Agostino Griffini, Piero Portaluppi, and Ferdinando Reggiori. it was inaugurated in 1953 with a major exhibition on Leonardo da Vinci. Guido Ucelli, who had long urged the scientific and political world to constitute an industrial museum, attentively followed the restoration works to the site and would chair the Museum with dedication for many years.


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2

PElTOn TURBInE WHEEl

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1940

Under the direction of Guido Ucelli, the Riva company grew from the industrial, technical, and commercial points of view. The significant technological development and the major increase in markets made the company a worldwide example of excellence. in 1922 the Pelton turbines destined for the Moncenisio-Venaus plant were constructed. After the 12,000-hp Peltons for the Grosotto plant, these turbines constituted an important technical conquest, because they exploited an exceptional fall of water, of more than 1000 m, reaching a power of 26,000 hp.


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3

RECOnSTRUCTIOn OF CalIgUla’S SHIP On laKE nEMI

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1891

The undertaking to recover the Nemi ships, longed for since the Renaissance and returned into vogue in the late 19th century, saw the personal commitment of Guido Ucelli. he provided the hydraulic machinery utilized to empty Lake Nemi, and he provided careful technical monitoring with sensitivity to the archaeological value. The emptying of the lake and the coordination of the teams employed would even today be two complex undertakings. one can only imagine what it must have been like in the 1920s. The ships brought to light were archaeological finds internationally recognized for their importance. They were burned during the war, and the only things remaining today are the reconstructions visible at the Museo delle Navi Romane in Nemi and part of the bronze decorations at the Museo Nazionale Romano at Palazzo Massimo.


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